Last edited by Kejind
Friday, July 17, 2020 | History

4 edition of The Germans in Texas found in the catalog.

The Germans in Texas

Gilbert Giddings Benjamin

The Germans in Texas

a study in immigration.

by Gilbert Giddings Benjamin

  • 280 Want to read
  • 17 Currently reading

Published by Publications of the University of Pennsylvania, D. Appleton & Company, publishing agents in Philadelphia, New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • German Americans -- Texas

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesAmericana Germanica : New series / Editor: M.D. Learned -- [v. 11], Library of American civilization -- LAC 15552., Americana Germanica -- [v. 11].
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination161 p.
    Number of Pages161
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13555054M
    OCLC/WorldCa11081258

    German-Americans were the largest ethnic contingent to fight for the Union in the American Civil War. More than , native Germans served in the Union Army, notably from New York, Wisconsin, and nds also served in the Confederacy, being primarily descended from Pennsylvania German ancestors who had migrated to the Carolinas in the 18th century and early 19th century, along with.   Though they were called Germans, the Texas Germans had a long and productive history in the Lone Star state. They first came under Mexican rule in as the largest ethnic group arriving directly from Europe, along with Poles and Czechs, also Catholics.

      By , there were more t Germans living in Texas, comprising more than one-fifth of the white population and making them one of the largest ethnic groups (after Latinos). The German immigrants tended to form their own German-speaking communities rather than assimilate with their English-and Spanish-speaking neighbors.   The book includes the translation of a study of Comanche language by German scholar Heinrich Berghaus. His study was based on data gathered by a young German settler in Texas, Emil Kriewitz, and included a groundbreaking list of Comanche words and their German translations.

    In the following year the British consul in Texas, William Kennedy, wrote in a dispatch that German farmers in the Republic were "laborious, persevering, and eager to accumulate," with the reputation of being very successful; and in a Texas newspaper praised the Germans of Austin County as "intelligent, industrious, and thrifty.". "The movement of Germans to Texas properly may be said to have begun in the year , for although there were a few Germans living their prior to the date, their presence did not attract fellow countrymen to join them. It was in that Friedrich Ernst, a native of Oldenburg, received a grant of land from the Mexican Government, lying within.


Share this book
You might also like
Understory cover-biomass relationships in the Front Range ponderosa pine zone

Understory cover-biomass relationships in the Front Range ponderosa pine zone

Journey through the Creation Museum

Journey through the Creation Museum

Mulled memories

Mulled memories

Lisa Hammond

Lisa Hammond

Glimpses of soliton theory

Glimpses of soliton theory

AWBC Productivity and Applications

AWBC Productivity and Applications

What if Tom Watson wasnt your founder

What if Tom Watson wasnt your founder

Wheel of Things

Wheel of Things

Memorial services held in the House of Representatives and Senate of the United States

Memorial services held in the House of Representatives and Senate of the United States

Take one home.

Take one home.

The ageof Civil War and Reconstruction, 1830-1900

The ageof Civil War and Reconstruction, 1830-1900

The Germans in Texas by Gilbert Giddings Benjamin Download PDF EPUB FB2

Many of the Germans were loyal to the Union, and they really were not slave-holders or believe in slavery. This created issues between other Texans and some of the Germans were shot or imprisoned and others were forced to sign loyalty oaths to the Confederacy.

Interesting book about a small part of Texas in the s through the Civil War/5(13). Germans also settled elsewhere in Texas. By the s German ethnic-islands dotted north central, northern, and western Texas. Ethnic islands failed to develop in East Texas, the Trans-Pecos, and the Rio Grande valley, however.

As early asGermans founded the colony of Marienfeld (later Stanton) on the High Plains of West Texas. It was. The appendix lists Germans who took part in the Texas revolution, instructions to new settlers, and the Adelsverein constitution. The work includes several maps and a item bibliography.

History of the German Element in Texas fromand Historical Sketches of the German Texas Singers' League and Houston Turnverein From. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

The book is focused on the immigrants, the number that were German and the parts of Texas in which they settled - New Braunfels, Fredericksburg, etc., as well as the the culture they brought with them, their political beliefs, the structure of German society, etc.5/5(1).

This book is part of the collection entitled: German Immigration to Texas and was provided by University of Texas at Arlington Library to The Portal to Texas History, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries.

It has been viewed times, with 21 in the last month. The largest immigration of Germans came in the s when the Adelsverein (The Society for the Protection of German Immigrants in Texas) organized at Biebrich on the Rhine near Mainz. It assisted thousands in coming to Central Texas and establishing such settlements as.

Rather, 69 percent identify themselves as Texas Germans. More than years after their ancestors began arriving, the majority still consider themselves, at their core, settlers. Author Kenneth Hafertepe is chair of the department of museum studies at Baylor University in Waco, Texas.

For this book, he spent more than a decade researching the history of Germans in Texas—visiting historic home sites and interviewing curators, archivists, historians, and descendants of pioneers.

During the brief history of the Republic of Texas (), o Germans emigrated to Texas. Perhaps best remembered today are the farmers who settled the Texas Hill Country, yet many of the German immigrants were merchants and businesspeople who helped make Galveston a thriving international port and Houston an early Texas business : University of Texas Press.

This book is part of the collection entitled: German Immigration to Texas and was provided to The Portal to Texas History by the University of Texas at Arlington Library.

View a full description of this by: 5. The first concerted effort to bring German settlers to Texas came inwhen Johann Friedrich Ernst (aka Friedrich Dirks), from the Grand Duchy of Oldenburg, received a grant of more than 4, acres in Stephen F.

Austin’s colony. He and his family were on a ship from New York to New Orleans and planned to move to Missouri, but changed. This book is based on a little-known article—published in German by Heinrich Berghaus in —that offered an early ethnographic and linguistic view of the Comanche nation.

The significance of this volume derives from the obscurity of the primary source, its relation to German-Comanche relations in Texas, and its contribution to preserving Author: William S.

Kiser. An absolutely gorgeous new book, "The Material Culture of German Texans," by former Austinite Ken Hafertepe, will be an enormous resource for. Remembering The Long Lost Germans Of Texas More than a century ago, German settlers found a pocket of Texas to call home between Austin and San Antonio.

And once the local lingo merged with their. During the brief history of the Republic of Texas (), o Germans emigrated to Texas.

Perhaps best remembered today are the farmers who settled the Texas Hill Country, yet many of the German immigrants were merchants and businesspeople who helped make Galveston a thriving international port and Houston an early Texas business center.

The Russian Germans under the Double Eagle and the Soviet Star: Including a Pictorial History of Cities, Landscapes and People. By Bernd G. Längin, Germans from Russia Heritage Collection, North Dakota State University Libraries, Fargo, North Dakota,pages, $ Softcover.

His book, which received its first American printing last month, offers a gripping account of the “suicide epidemic” that swept the Third Reich in its final days. Huber also provides a revealing look into the minds and souls of ordinary Germans forced to confront the reality of Nazism.

Gelo and Wickham's book should not be missed by anyone interested in the cultures, languages, history, and geography of Texas. The perfect book for anyone wanting to learn about how Comanches and Germans came into contact in Central Texas during the middle of the 19th century.” — Hans C.

Boas, author of The Life and Death of Texas German. German Texans actively participated in politics, and by a German language version of Texas law was in place. InMeusebach began a term as a Texas senator.

A number of Germans fought in the war for Texas independence. Despite the general desire to remain with the Union, many Germans fought on the side of the Confederacy in the Civil War.

The German Settlement of Texas after TERRY G. JORDAN* HE MIGRATION OF GERMANS TO TEXAS IN THE PERIOD BEFORE has received the attention of many scholars, and the colonization activities of the A delsverein, Henri Castro, Friedrich Ernst, John Kilian, and others are well known to students of Texas history and historical ge-ography.

"Germans to America," compiled and edited by Ira A. Glazier and P. William Filby, is a series of books which indexes passenger arrival records of ships carrying Germans to the U.S. ports of Baltimore, Boston, New Orleans, New York, and Philadelphia.

It presently covers the records of over 4 million passengers during the period January   So newly arrived Germans were directed to a steppingstone on the way to the promised land grant: Fredericksburg, which went from population .